Greenstructure and Urban Planning - Case Study - Sheffield, UK -Basic Facts - greenspace in Sheffield

Introduction

Background

Landscape

Geology and biodiversity

Planning process

Biodiversity in domestic gardens

Greenspace policies

Basic facts -

Greenstructure history

Historic gardens and parks

Woodland

Greenspace planning

Botanical gardens

Other UK greenstructure plans

Sheffield Greenspace Atlas

Statistics on Sheffield's greenspaces

Sheffield Wildlife Trust

Greenspaces of Stocksbridge District Sheffield

Greenspace Management in Stocksbridge District

Need for Greenstructure Planning in the UK

Some basic facts about the City (Source: Sheffield City Council website)

  • One third of Sheffield's 36238 hectares lie within the Peak District National Park (no other UK city has part of a national park within its boundary). Another third is agricultural, with some scattered villages, and the other third is urban.
  • Sheffield is England's greenest city, containing 150 woodlands and 50 substantial public parks
  • Half of the City's population of over 500,000 live within 15 minutes of open countryside
  • Sheffield is officially the 'safest' city in the UK (according to Government statistics) and this encourages use of the greenspaces
  • A potential workforce of over 1 million people live within 1 hour's drive of the City, which makes it an attractive location for a range of employers
  • Established and growing areas of expertise include metals and glass technology, biosciences, medical technology and creative industries
  • Sheffield's two universities teach more than 45,000 students

Map showing the distribution of greenspace within the Metropolitan district boundary and

 

Basic facts about Sheffield City's Parks and Greenspaces (Source: Sheffield City Council website)

  • The third of the city that is urban contains a wide variety of parks, woodlands and green open spaces. The city-owned greenspaces include: 78 public Parks, 10 Gardens, over 170 Woodlands, over130 Children's Playgrounds, 74 Allotment sites, 1 Animal Farm, 24 Sports sites, and hundreds of other green open spaces. There are also 45 Community Buildings many associated with greenspaces.
  • Local surveys have shown that the greenspaces are highly regarded by the community and recognised as an important part of the City's landscape character and heritage
  • The greenspaces are regarded as culturally important, providing opportunities for sports, events, children's play, walking and relaxation for all ethnic and all age groups
  • They are recognised as a feature which contributes significantly to people's health and well-being
  • Many are highly valued for their wildlife and biodiversity and all the greenspaces are regarded for the potential their presence creates to enhance biodiversity through active habitat creation and management
  • The greenspaces are extremely popular and it has been calculated that they attract over 25 million visits each year. They have their own dedicated maintenance staff and in addition a Ranger Service provides a visible and reassuring presence to encourage greater use and enjoyment of the City's natural heritage. The rangers' work includes supporting communities and voluntary groups. The rangers undertake practical greenspace-related projects with community groups and encourage activities and events. Annually, Sheffield's parks and greenspaces host in excess of 200 events, from large shows, festivals and galas, to guided walks and local activity days.

A map of the major greenspaces owned by the city can be downloaded from their website:

http://www.sheffield.gov.uk/out--about/maps

 

A special department, The Parks, Woodlands and Countryside Service, is responsible for the open spaces owned by the city.

 

Greenspaces maintained by Sheffield City Parks department

Type of greenspace

hectares

number of sites

Formal parks

1830

78 sites

Woodland

1400

Allotments

74 sites

Play areas

124 sites

Cemeteries and Crematoria

8 sites

Diagram of Nature Conservation in Sheffield - This sketch map shows the distribution of SSSIs (Sites of special scientific interest) to the west of the city where it joins the Peak District National Park (orange lines), together with the distribution of woodlands with nature conservation value (dark green). The other woodlands (mid-green) and the major parks ( light green) within the city are indicated as these all have the potential to develop some level of biodiversity over time. The red lines are the Ward Boundaries (administrative areas). For full details of the information available with regard to sites of national interest visit the English Nature website

Resources available for greenspace maintenance in 2002:
A team of 135 permanent and up to 30 seasonal staff work to a gross budget of £5.7 million. In addition the team is involved in externally funded projects to the value of £20 million.
See full information on Sheffield City website

The following table indicates the percentage of the land area which is greenspace in each of the Wards which make up Sheffield City

The quantity of greenspace is approximate only - it includes all unbuilt land but not small private gardens

 

Introduction

Background

Landscape

Geology and biodiversity

Planning process

Biodiversity in domestic gardens

Greenspace policies

Basic facts -

Greenstructure history

Historic gardens and parks

Woodland

Greenspace planning

Botanical gardens

Sheffield Greenspace Atlas

Statistics on Sheffield's greenspaces

Sheffield Wildlife Trust

Greenspaces of Stocksbridge District Sheffield

Greenspace Management in Stocksbridge District

Need for Greenstructure Planning in the UK

All photographs are © Anne R. Beer, 2003 but users are free to download and use as they wish, with the proviso that the copyright is always acknowledged. Students may use the text as they wish provided they again acknowledge the sources of the text.

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